Tools

Brackets…. recent-projects… another useful extension

When (or if) you start using Brackets now, you see that its still very early stuff.

This is deliberate and with full intend of the team behind it, in order to truly make it a community driven effort and to ensure that the project stays aligned with its commission: developed for developers by developers.

This also means that its far from the IDE you may be used to still has a long way to go before its a fully fletched code editor at the level we are used to from other tools…

Anyways, one of things you will start missing is the management of Projects, now luckily Narciso Jarmilo (member of the Brackets team and employee at Adobe), has implemented a simple way of maintaining a list of the most recent projects.

Not only does it provide you with a shortcut to the most recent projects you have been working on, but it also illustrates how simple it is to add functionality that you find necessary.

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Having a rich extensibility model has proven over and over again to be more critical to the viability of a tool than having it being springloaded with code-editor-killer features out of the box… and Brackets has done exactly that.

If there is something you see missing, you can easily build it yourself and share it back into the community… thats the groove of Brackets and that’s actually pretty cool…

A 3rd thing Narciso’s extension does, is to illustrate how its possible to integrate your extension with the ProjectManager… now this was what actually brought me to his extension in the first place, because I will now start building my own extension using the notion of projects…

Check out Narciso’s extension here…
https://github.com/njx/brackets-recent-projects

Tools

brackets… another extension… annotation

To get into extending and adding functionality for Brackets is impressively easy…

David Deraedt has undertaken the feat of implementing an Annotation Extension which will provide developers with shortcuts to adding comments to their Brackets files…

Here is how it looks when I run it on my machine…

Obviously, the comment inserted is very simple, however remember this is very very early work and if you take a look at the code for generating this, you will appreciate the simplicity of the Brackets Extensibility Model and see that the entire extension is a mere 133 lines of JavaScript code at this point (including comments).

Check out the extension here…
https://github.com/davidderaedt/annotate-extension

…or have a look at other extension initiatives here…
https://github.com/adobe/brackets/wiki/Brackets-Extensions

…and please don’t forget, if you dont see what you like or need, its simple to just do it yourself using HTML, CSS and JavaScript combined with the elegant Extensibility API’s of Brackets.

Tools

BRACKETS… Your First Extension

…at the core of Brackets, you find an unparalleled open ness and tremendously awesome technology stack !

On top of the awesomeness of the technology stack and in the middle of some tremendously cool features build into Brackets by the team, you find a very simple extensibility model which allows anyone with knowledge of the basic Web Technologies, to write their own custom extensions in Brackets itself and using the same technologies we are using for the system we are making with Brackets…

Basically, every developers wet dream come true…

To get you started, the team behind Brackets has made a Quick-Start tutorial for getting started writing you own extension… it’s naturally a Hello World extension.

It will take you less than 5 mins to go through every step in the tutorial (including downloading the only 34 MB Brackets binary) and tweaking Mr. Hello World to say your name and make another or two small tweaks…

You can find the tutorial here…
https://github.com/adobe/brackets/wiki/How-to-Write-Extensions

The source code for the tutorial are made available, and can be found here…
https://github.com/adobe/brackets/wiki/Simple-%22Hello-World%22-extension

Now, obviously popping up an Alert in response to a MenuClick is poor UI, so don’t make that mistake; but instead take a look at the Extension UI Guidelines:
https://github.com/adobe/brackets/wiki/Extension-UI-Guidelines

If you’re working on anything big, its recommended you post to the brackets-dev Google group or the #brackets IRC channel on freenode early on so you can get feedback (there may be others working on similar ideas!).

For more detail on Brackets internals, see Brackets Development How Tos.
If you’re interested in contributing to the core Brackets codebase, see How to Hack on Brackets.

Tools, Uncategorized

Trello… now with an API (Beta)

Trello is not only a very useful task management system, incorporating SCRUM board approach with HTML5 and an exceptional nice look and feel… now it also has a very elegant REST API.

Check it out…
https://trello.com/docs/

Here is a quick sample on how to retrieve the cards for the current user… using the Client.js JavaScript class that Trello is providing asn easy way to get started…
http://jsfiddle.net/nNesx/

They have opened up their development plans in the form of their internal development board…
https://trello.com/api

DevelopmentMethodology, Tools

The Brackets Team… using Trello

In my optics (and obviously when wearing my coders goggles) Brackets is the most exciting news to come out of San Jose this year… not only is the team targeting to build an entirely new code IDE for web projects, but they have decided to do it in a new way… a way that may prove both to be more challenging as a traditional product development approach as well as more rewarding as members of the community starts joining the development effort by adding both core features as well as extensions (an extension API is on its way) even from the very beginning of its lifetime…

Anyways, what I wanted to share was that the Brackets team is using Trello as their SCRUM board.. being a happy Trello user myself, this is off course both interesting and exciting…

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The Brackets Team obviously practices Scrum. They have decided to work iteratively and produce stable builds every 2.5 weeks (12 coding days to be exact). A rather unusual number, however it works for the Adobe Brackets team… Development started in January 2012 so it’s still in the very early stages of the project.

The project goes under the parole: Code Free ! So I suggest you do exactly that, join the project, contribute a feature or two, learn a lot and then take this approach and apply to your development efforts in your own circles, being commercial or not, the approach is clever and when executed correctly, can empower to teams and the extended teams like no other approach…