ActionScript 3.0, Flash Platform, HTML5

Introducing FlashJS… another promising mediator between Flash and HTML5

FlashJS was born at the crossroad of HTML / CSS and beautiful Flash objective model that is known by many interactive developers and fits great for game development.

This library allows to develop HTML5 games and applications in the way that is similar to ordinary AS3 development. FlashJS was designed to show maximum perfomance for HTML/CSS platforms.

Check it out…
http://www.flashjs.com/

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ActionScript 3.0, Flash Platform

A new Starling is born… time to start pushing those pixels around…

Starling was born today… I have to admit, when I first learned about it during an evening of fun in Los Angeles, I wasn’t all that sure what it would mean for me… however as time has passed since, I realize that we are all in need of developers being able to push pixels around in an ever increasing speed, with higher accuracy and most critically, with increasingly higher fidelity…

…Starling gives us a whole new spectrum of possibilities when building resource demanding user experiences on the e.g. handhelds… instead of repeating what Daniel Sperl already wrote better than I can do on his own blog, I will merely encourage you to check out his blog and his latest blog post on the release of the first production version of Starling….

Adobe, Flash Platform

Adobe roadmap for the Flash runtimes

For the past decade, Flash Player and, more recently, Adobe AIR have played a vital role on the web by providing consistent platforms for deploying rich, expressive content across browsers, desktops, and devices. Beginning as a platform for enabling animation, the Flash runtimes have evolved into a complete multimedia platform, enabling experiences that were otherwise not possible or feasible on the web.

Today Adobe published their latest vision for these platforms in the form of a whitepaper… check it out…
http://www.adobe.com/devnet/flashplatform/whitepapers/roadmap.html

Adobe, Flash Platform, Google

Adobe and Google Partnering for Flash Player on Linux

Adobe has been working closely with Google to develop a single modern API for hosting plugins within the browser (one which could replace the current Netscape plugin API being used by the Flash Player). The PPAPI, code-named “Pepper” aims to provide a layer between the plugin and browser that abstracts away differences between browser and operating system implementations.

This is GREAT news for Flash and Flex folks out there, ever since Adobe decided to discontinue their effort to support Air for Linux in favor of focusing more on Android, its always been a thorn in the foot regarding Linux support…

Check it out…
http://blogs.adobe.com/flashplayer/2012/02/adobe-and-google-partnering-for-flash-player-on-linux.html

ActionScript 3.0, Adobe, Flash Platform, Flex, JavaScript, Open Source, Tools

Adobe’s view of Flex and its commitments to Flex in the future

Its no secret that Adobe has been going through a turbulent patch the recent months while they have been implementing their new adaptive strategy to an unruly future.

Its included layoffs and new hirings, internal repositioning and new layouts of their many divisions within services and products and they have taken a deep look at the business in terms products and offerings in the process of optimizing their market profile…

Its been painful, not only to see beloved team members leave Adobe but also to see that this major company refurbishing has not really been successfully communicated to both community, but also to users of the software and companies using services based on Adobe partners… even investors has been confused by the lack of diligence in the communication, however, its increasingly behind us as the new changes are settling in and the changes to the teams is stabilizing…

One of the massively controversial changes was the dealing with the future vision for Flex and the Flash Platform… I will not go into details with what has transpired over the past months, its well documented on every blog and site relevant to the community and product ecosystem and its not with a great pleasure I’m looking back on the past months… so let’s leave it behind and instead focus on the most recent statement from Adobe on their vision for Flex…

Now, there is not a lot new statements under the sun, however in contrast to the scrambling messages and divergent directions we have been seeing until now, its nice to see that Adobe has taken a deep breath and made a firm statement which would be difficult to misinterpret either positively or negatively…

If you are in a hurry and not interested in reading the entire writeup, I’m sharing with you the conclusion in a nutshell which confirms some of the more positive statements we have seen over the past months…

Adobe believes that Flex is the best solution for enterprise and data-centric application development today and is moving Flex into a community-driven open source project to ensure the continued development and success of Flex for years to come. We are currently in the process of contributing the core Flex SDK, automation libraries, AIR SDK binaries, and documentation to the Apache Flex Project. We will also be contributing Falcon, Falcon JS, Mustella, and BlazeDS.

In addition to these contributions, Adobe is providing a team of full-time Flex SDK engineers who will contribute to and support the Apache Flex Project. These Adobe engineers will work directly with the highly skilled Flex developer community to maintain, support, and evolve the Flex SDK. We remain committed to enabling the success of all existing and new Flex projects.

Thank you Adobe, for setting the record straight and for sharing with us your intentions and vision for Flex… its a privilege to be on the team…

Adobe, Flash Platform, Open Source

OpenSource AVM… Tamarind

Project Tamarind, once so promising and bespoken project… was co-owned by Adobe Systems and Mozilla Foundation, and has been discontinued for more than 3 years now…

However, the sad state of this cool OpenSource project is that it hasn’t been touched since March 2008…


The members from Adobe are mostly names I have never heard of so I sincerely wonder what have become of them (perhaps they are still engineering in the dungeons of San Jose), anyways check the names out for yourself…

If anyone knows the obituary belonging to Project Tamarind, please do share… it seems to have been a massive Adobe effort that apparently ended up in a fruitless archive of The Mozilla Foundation.

Anyways, you can check out the archived project home page here…
http://www-archive.mozilla.org/projects/tamarin/

Flash Platform, Open Source

OpenSource AVM… Re-Introducing GNASH

In the middle of 2008 I first time wrote about what I then thought was a cool but remotely stupefying OpenSource project… Gnash !

Gnash is the GNU SWF movie player, which can be run standalone on the desktop or an embedded device, as well as as a plugin for several browsers.

Gnash is capable of reading up to SWF v9 files and opcodes, but primarily supports SWF v7, with better SWF v8 and v9 support under heavy development. Since the 0.8.2 release, Gnash includes initial parser support for SWF v8 and v9. Not all ActionScript 2 classes are implemented yet, but all of the most heavily used ones are. Many ActionScript 2 classes are partially implemented; there is support for all of the commonly used methods of each class.

Gnash has implemented about 80% of ActionScript v2.0, and has begun implementing ActionScript v3.0. Gnash supports the majority of Flash opcodes up to SWF v9, and a wide sampling of ActionScript classes for SWF v8.

Obviously Gnash is also very far from providing a serious alternative as AVM machine tor widespread use, its basic use case now would be embedded on a chip, however the advent of readily available Android kind of defeats this purpose now, doesn’t it ?

Anyways, check out the main developers website…
http://www.gnashdev.org/